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Archive for the ‘Henderson’ Category

Walterhill damI grew up feeling that Walterhill, Tennessee was my true home: the place where my roots were deepest. My maternal grandparents Ruth and Blackburn Batey lived at the crossroads of Jefferson Pike and Lebanon Road – which is arguably the heart of Walterhill. I lived the first five years of my life there, and it was my second home throughout childhood. In this area lived not only my grandparents, but also two sets of great grandparents, four sets of GG grandparents, two sets of GGG grandparents, two sets of GGGG grandparents, and three sets of GGGGG grandparents – not to mention an uncountable number of aunts, uncles, cousins, and other relatives. It remained the place where I felt most deeply connected until my grandmother Ruth Henderson Batey passed away at age 97 in 2008. (more…)

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John Basse is my GGGGGGGGGGG Grandfather.

John Basse was born in London, England on September 7, 1616, the third of a dozen children born to Nathaniel and Mary Jordan Basse. Little could anyone know that this well-born English child would be the sole survivor of an enormous massacre in a far-away land, that he would be raised as a member of an Indian tribe, that he would marry an Indian princess, have eight children with her, live to the age of 85, and have countless descendants, many of whom would still tell his story four hundred years later. But he was born in a time of change, and this great adventure was his destiny.

Engraving of Pocahontas, 1616

Engraving of Pocahontas, 1616

Three months before John’s birth, the exotic Indian princess, Pocahontas and her English husband, John Rolfe arrived in England amid great fanfare along with the very first shipment of tobacco from a far away colony in a little-known place called Virginia. Only nine years earlier, the first intrepid band of English adventurers had established a settlement there called Jamestowne. It was to become the first permanent settlement of English speaking peoples in the New World.

John’s grandfather, Humphrey Basse and his brothers, William and Thomas were French Huguenots who immigrated to London during the reign of Elizabeth I seeking religious freedom. Humphrey married Mary Bouchier, daughter of Dominick and Genevieve Bouchier, also French Huguenots. Humphrey was an entrepreneurial man, first as a merchant haberdasher, and then as an investor and stockholder in the Virginia Company which financed settlements in Jamestowne, Virginia. Humphrey invested in the Third Charter of the Virginia Company signing as a founder on March 12, 1612. (more…)

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Researched by my mother, Annette Batey Pittard, May 10, 2000
Updated by Billy Pittard July 22, 2013

This is the story of my Henderson ancestry in Rutherford County, Tennessee. It begins with Samuel Henderson, my first Henderson ancestor to move to the area, and comes forward to my mother’s generation. This story was researched and prepared by my mother, Annette Batey Pittard in the year 2000. I have made a few edits to bring it up to date, and added pictures. My mother was a G.G.G.G.G. granddaughter of Samuel Henderson (1737-1818), the progenitor of my Henderson line in Rutherford County.

1958, Four generations of Henderson descendants at the golden wedding anniversary of Tab and Hattie Henderson.

1958, Four generations of Henderson descendants at the golden wedding anniversary of Tab and Hattie Henderson.

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Many of our family cemeteries have fallen into terrible disrepair. Rutherford County’s recent population growth and real estate development seems to have accelerated the damage and decline of our family cemeteries. Headstones and tombs are being toppled, broken and even bulldozed. Even the more remote cemeteries are falling into ruin through neglect and the advance of nature. If we don’t act soon, these ancestral grounds may be lost forever.

The Hoover Family Cemetery at Walterhill has fallen into complete disrepair, and was essentially lost to the family until recently. Most of the headstones are down and broken.

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This is the story of my GGGGG grandparents, Shelah and Nancy Turner Waters.

This photo is of Shelah Waters Senior or Junior. I believe it is Senior because of the similarity of the face and a comparison of clothing in other known portraits.

Seventh among nine siblings, Shelah Waters was born July 8, 1768 in Charles County, Maryland – an area where his ancestors had lived for at least four generations.

Christened with the unusual biblical name, Shelah (usually pronounced “Shee-lee”), he would eventually become the namesake of numerous male descendants and their neighbors. There is no record as to the reason for his name, except that it was chosen from the Bible, as were the names of three of his brothers, Rezin, Asenath, and Enos.

Fifth among eleven children, Nancy Turner was born Oct. 12, 1770, also in Charles County, Maryland. Her ancestors had lived in the area for even longer than the Waters family, for Nancy’s GGG grandfather Arthur Turner had been among the earliest English settlers in Maryland. (more…)

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The following is a transcription of a 22-page booklet that was printed in 1879 for a memorial celebration in honor of my GGGGG Grandfather, Shelah Waters, Sr.

Gratitude goes to Mr. Mike Hunter of Hunter Funeral Home in Watertown, Tennessee for allowing me to photocopy his original copy of this booklet.

The title page

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One summer day in 1924, the descendants of my GGG grandfather, William M. “Buck” Short (1827-1913) and their families gathered at Buck’s former home at Mona in the northern part of Rutherford County, Tennessee. In the eleven years that had passed since Buck had passed away at age 85, the home had come into the possession of his ninth child, Ashkenaz, or “Ash” as he was commonly known. A total of eighty descendants and spouses gathered for this family reunion. (more…)

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The house that Mariah and Billy Malone built. Completed in 1835. This house and property remains in the family nearly 200 years after the original log structure and its adjoining land were purchased by William N. Malone. The house is now the home of Bruce and Asta Werme. Asta is a GGG granddaughter of Mariah and Billy Malone.

Foreword

Recently it occurred to me that I happened to know quite a bit about my ancestor Mariah J. Hoover Malone, but I had never put it all together. That prompted me to write this biography. I suppose it is a prejudice of genealogical research that we tend to focus more on male ancestors. But in my family, I have come to recognize that there have been many strong female ancestors who sometimes played more critical roles in my family history than their husbands. Mariah Hoover Malone turns out to be one of those women. (more…)

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The Hoover Family cemetery in 2011

The Hoover Family cemetery in 2010

More commonly known as the Walterhill Community Cemetery, the Hoover Family Cemetery is the final resting place of John Hoover, Sr. (1777-1845) and most of his immediate family. (more…)

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I believe this house was built by John Hoover and that it is the oldest house in Walterhill.

I believe this house was built by John Hoover and that it’s the oldest house in Walterhill.

John Hoover, Sr. is my GGGGG grandfather.

Born July 13, 1777, place not known
Died June 8, 1845 at Walterhill, Rutherford County, TN.

John Hoover arrived in the Walterhill, TN area some time around 1800 among the area’s early settlers.

In 1802 “John Hoover, Esquire” is noted to have been the millwright of one of the first mills in the county. The mill was originally owned and operated by John Cummins and later was known as Pearce Mills. A century later the milldam at Pearce Mills was replaced with a concrete dam to serve as the first hydro-electric plant in the county. That concrete dam remains visible from the bridge that crosses Stones River at Walterhill. (more…)

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